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Forums Forums Magic, Witchcraft and Healing Just wanted to share my joy: finally going back to college!!!

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    Soo, two years ago I had to leave my university and take a break from my studies because of my deteriorating mental health. Spent the last two years battling depression and schizophrenia. But I’m finally feeling ready and strong enough to continue my studies. And I just got the confirmation that I was accepted back into my university, with two years of my bachelor’s left!

    I am feeling elated, but also terrified haha. I am afraid that after such a long break and countless medications my brain won’t be able to study and retain information like it used to. I literally feel dumber and my memory is worse. I am aware that it will be difficult, but I still have those creeping doubts telling me I won’t make it through.

    Has anyone here been in a similar situation and have any advice for me? Or just any reassuring words, please 🖤🖤🖤

    Anyway, I love how supportive this community is and I just wanted to share this news. Have a great day!

  • Just wanted to share my joy: finally going back to college!!!

  • Mountain_Flamingo4

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    You’re gonna do amazing! The brain is a funny thing, it will bounce back very quickly. It’s like starting at the gym again, the first few times are difficult but the more you go the better you get! The brain is exactly the same. Make sure you take care of yourself and have fun 🙂

  • Cat-Lover20

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    If it helps, brain changes from depression are reversible!

  • ragged_insomnia_

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    Hey, congratulations! I was in the same boat as you last year, but I’ve finished a year of studies since my break and it’s going ok! The brain will “wake up” a little later into the semester, and even if you never feel like you did before, it’s ok, you’ve grown. Don’t listen to your doubts and to anyone that may be criticizing your journey, you’ll do great!

  • ornerycraftfish

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    Literally just started, keep freaking out because it is a lot, and I’ve been out of school about seven times longer! BUT take advantage of the early option to drop a course if you need to (if it doesn’t affect your aid) and do your best to prioritize the school work. My job is getting surprised Pikachu face because I’m going, “No, I’m studying.” (Also managed to rearrange my schedule for mostly open days with remote evenings, but do what you can! Just *stick to your study times!*)

    Most importantly: communicate often and early with your professors, and know AND TAKE ADVANTAGE of all the resources your school offers. *Especially* make sure to apply for accommodations. I did, and I know it’s gonna help save my ass on a few things. Student Services should have a department you can sit down with to discuss what is available and what may work with you. You will probably need to have documentation on hand though.

    We got this, dude. You’re gonna finish your bachelor’s and get a sweet gig, I’m gonna change my career, and *we are gonna kick so much ass.* 🙏

    Eta: the cobwebs do lessen the more you do, it might just be a little bumpy at the start. Third day straight and it’s not *quite* as painful as the first. Brain is certainly very bruised from its new exercise, but it’ll toughen up in a week or three!

  • Josie_Rose88

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    Living with schizophrenia can be tough (I have a few family members who have it) but I’m sure you’ll do great. It may take time to get back in the groove with school but we’re all rooting for you. Keep up with you meds and avoid psychedelics and you’ll have that degree in hand in no time.

  • Cultural-Ad9212

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    Thats amazing to hear ❤️ best of luck

  • mgentry999

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    In January I went back to school after 11 years. In the first day I called my friend in a panic because I was terrified that I’d made a mistake. Now 2 quarters in and I’ve made Dean’s list both terms and have a full scholarship for next year.

    You got this! You are 2 years older and know that this is what you want to do. Brains are resilient. Stay on your meds and work hard and you will succeed. I believe in you.

  • Top-Vermicelli7279

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    Congratulations! You have got this! I am so proud of you for getting to this point! I’ll echo to take advantage of accommodations. I will also add that after a traumatic brain injury, I had to learn to memorize in different ways. If you feel like you are slogging, check with tutors to see if they can suggest different ways to get information in. You can and will do this!

  • JozsefJK

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    I’m not a medical doctor but look into Sarcosine and NAC and run them by your psychiatrist. There is extensive published evidence of psych use if NAC and some of sarcosine for Sz. They helped my friends cognitive symptoms of schizophrenia and memory related side effects.

  • rask0ln

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    i’m so proud of you!! i was in the same situation and i can imagine the worries and overthinking 😬 what helped me was to slowly incorporating habits/skills that i knew i would use in school (reading texts that weren’t entertaining; practising annotations etc.) and, if you have the option or if you kept in touch with some of your former classmates, contact someone who studies the same subject to give you more info about teachers, expectations (that helped me with overthiking sm) or ask for accommodations, if your school offers those

    also don’t forget to prioritise your mental health so you don’t burn out trying to overcompensate! good luck, you’ve got this

  • NightWorldPerson

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    One thing to really help anyone who doesn’t have those study skills anymore is to get this book called, *College Study Skills by Dianna L. Van Blerkom*. It greatly helped me to understand how to do schooling and to make a studying habit that works for me.

    Another thing to help with memory issues is by playing games like chess or tetris! I have a TBI and it greatly helps with my memory and learning getting back up to speed.

  • eileen404

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    Not the same, but I went back to grad school years later. You’re always learning, just not formally. You’ll be fine. Stay on the meds you need and you’ll be miles ahead of the kids who never left as you’ve extra maturity and will know to actually study and do your work instead of partying. I was amazed how easy a 4.0 was when I went back because I was used to working 9-5.

    Editing to add, and your brain’s young so you’ll do fine. It’s still in the growing/learning new things stage when things come easier. You’ll do fine.

  • swertyguppy

    Guest
    September 18, 2023 at 1:02 am

    I recently returned to my studies (June) after taking a one year break to focus on managing depression/burnout 🙂 I relate a lot to what you’ve written and was also quite afraid of returning. Additionally, I was really proud of myself for even getting to a place to walk back in the door and I invite you to be proud of that as well!

    When returning, I gave myself oodles of self compassion knowing that even if I wasn’t successful or had to withdraw again, it was an achievement just to get to the place of feeling like I could try again. Congratulations for getting to that point!

    Practical kinda anecdote: I definitely eased back in to returning to school. Before classes, I started by ‘studying’ (more like, briefly reading/skimming) topics related to my program (journal articles, etc) just to try to build my capacity/see how my body was reacting. I started at an hour a day of self-study and built up from there. Very low expectations for retention, more like exposure therapy to get used to the industry jargon, etc. I listened to podcasts and little youtube videos that felt easier to digest, but still helped me ‘get in the zone’. When I was actually in school, I accepted that my capacity was reduced so just made adjustments to lower expectations as much as possible (fewer courses, lowered grade expectations, scheduled more time to get through things, curated my lifestyle&schedule to have more downtime, etc).

    Energetics/witchy kinda anecdote: Returning to class really helped with my healing. The energetics of physically being in a place where I had felt extremely low in the past and comparing that to how I felt in the present was extremely profound. I wasn’t quite prepared for how emotional that would be and the first few weeks contained a lot of grief. Holding space for that grief was important for me. Ultimately I was able to come to a place where I realized it had been energetically completely in alignment for me to have broken down/retreated/taken a break to heal when I did (“the gift of choicelessness”, if you will lol), and I’m grateful that it happened to be in alignment to return when I did.

    Congratulations on your hard work to get to this point. I’m really hoping your transition back to class is graceful, meaningful, and filled with lots of self-compassion, love for yourself, and gratitude for your journey thus far 🙂 We believe in you!

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